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Details

  • Kit includes a liquid-filled compass, one Heatsheets survival blanket, a mini Rescue Flash signal mirror and a slim Rescue Howler™ whistle
  • Also includes a survival fishing kit packed in a vial and Tinder-Quick™ waterproof fire starter
  • A roll of 50 in. x 2 in. duct tape has many uses
  • The SOL Scout survival kit weighs 5.4 oz. and measures 6 x 3.75 x 1 in.

View all SOL Emergency Supplies

REI membership

Specs

Best Use Emergency Preparedness
Dimensions 6 x 3.75 x 1 inches
Weight 5.4 ounces
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nice starter survival kit After attending the REI wilderness survival workshop, I took their advice to create a survival kit to carry on day hikes (when I wouldn't have my regular backpacking supplies). This kit serves as a nice base for that--it has fire starting supplies, survival blanket, a whistle, duct tape--even a signal mirror and compass. However, the workshop recommends adding a 1 liter stainless steel water bottle (for boiling water), water treatment tablets, picture wire, a small knife, flashlight, ziplock bags, various types of line, fishing hooks, and chapstick. I've added these and an ultralight first aid kit. I now feel prepared to survive a night in the wilderness. This supplemented kit is a nice insurance policy to take on day hikes.
Date published: 2014-09-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from SOL Scourt Survival Kit Excellent ideas but poor execution...other SOL kits include a Fox brand signal whistle; superior to the flimsy "rescue howler" included in this kit. Fishing kit? Maybe in a dedicated long-term kit, not a 72-hour get home/get rescued kit like this one. That small space could have included a simple butane lighter. Overall, a good "start" so as to show folks what type of items they should include in a personal survival kit. Would I recommend it? Based on the quality of the components included, I would not.
Date published: 2014-11-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good place to start Picked one of these up a while ago while browsing in a local REI. As someone mentioned in another review, this small kit is a good place to start, but I would add a few items before I would call it trail ready. It does (barely) cover warmth with the blanket and fire starters, but I would probably add another fire starting method such as a burning glass, a few matches, or a small lighter. This kit does essentially nothing to address water, I would add a couple of water treatment tables and tuck a heavy duty quart zip-top bag in or put the entire pouch into a wide-mouth water bottle. No first aide supplies to be found...but you already have a decent first aid kit, right? There is room for a few adhesive bandages and a foil package of antibiotic ointment, but not much more. There is no knife or cutting tool in the kit, but I don't leave the house without a good pocket knife anyway. As for the rest of the items: the fishing kit doesn't make a whole lot of sense, but I kept mine in because you never know what you might need a safety pin or some fishing line for. If you plan on being lost long enough to need food, it's probably a good idea to start with a better kit than this. Duct tape? Sure, why not. If I get a hole in my zip-top bag I'll be able to patch it. I haven't tried the compass, but I'm sure it works. The mirror and whistle are good things to have, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with how to best use a signal mirror before getting lost. This isn't my primary survival kit, but what's nice about it is that it comes in a small, convenient package that I can just tuck into a jacket pocket for short jaunts. I recommend it, with the above caveats.
Date published: 2015-02-02
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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Nice starter survival kit After attending the REI wilderness survival workshop, I took their advice to create a survival kit to carry on day hikes (when I wouldn't have my regular backpacking supplies). This kit serves as a nice base for that--it has fire starting supplies, survival blanket, a whistle, duct tape--even a signal mirror and compass. However, the workshop recommends adding a 1 liter stainless steel water bottle (for boiling water), water treatment tablets, picture wire, a small knife, flashlight, ziplock bags, various types of line, fishing hooks, and chapstick. I've added these and an ultralight first aid kit. I now feel prepared to survive a night in the wilderness. This supplemented kit is a nice insurance policy to take on day hikes.
Date published: 2014-09-26
Rated 2 out of 5 by from SOL Scourt Survival Kit Excellent ideas but poor execution...other SOL kits include a Fox brand signal whistle; superior to the flimsy "rescue howler" included in this kit. Fishing kit? Maybe in a dedicated long-term kit, not a 72-hour get home/get rescued kit like this one. That small space could have included a simple butane lighter. Overall, a good "start" so as to show folks what type of items they should include in a personal survival kit. Would I recommend it? Based on the quality of the components included, I would not.
Date published: 2014-11-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A good place to start Picked one of these up a while ago while browsing in a local REI. As someone mentioned in another review, this small kit is a good place to start, but I would add a few items before I would call it trail ready. It does (barely) cover warmth with the blanket and fire starters, but I would probably add another fire starting method such as a burning glass, a few matches, or a small lighter. This kit does essentially nothing to address water, I would add a couple of water treatment tables and tuck a heavy duty quart zip-top bag in or put the entire pouch into a wide-mouth water bottle. No first aide supplies to be found...but you already have a decent first aid kit, right? There is room for a few adhesive bandages and a foil package of antibiotic ointment, but not much more. There is no knife or cutting tool in the kit, but I don't leave the house without a good pocket knife anyway. As for the rest of the items: the fishing kit doesn't make a whole lot of sense, but I kept mine in because you never know what you might need a safety pin or some fishing line for. If you plan on being lost long enough to need food, it's probably a good idea to start with a better kit than this. Duct tape? Sure, why not. If I get a hole in my zip-top bag I'll be able to patch it. I haven't tried the compass, but I'm sure it works. The mirror and whistle are good things to have, I would recommend familiarizing yourself with how to best use a signal mirror before getting lost. This isn't my primary survival kit, but what's nice about it is that it comes in a small, convenient package that I can just tuck into a jacket pocket for short jaunts. I recommend it, with the above caveats.
Date published: 2015-02-02
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Questions & Answers

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