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REI Trekker 1.75 Self-Inflating Pad

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Stow it, strap it, pack it! The REI Trekker 1.75 pad offers lightweight sleeping comfort for backpacking, camping or traveling.

  • Horizontally cored foam is engineered to be lightweight and compressible without compromising warmth
  • Quick-closing, high-volume airflow valve allows the pad to inflate and deflate quickly
  • Non-slip, brushed polyester upper surface is soft to the touch; 75-denier polyester bottom surface resists wear
  • R-Value equals 5.6
  • Included stuff sack protects pad during transport and ensures a compact parcel every time

Imported.

Item 778148

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REI Trekker 1.75 Self-Inflating Pad Specs
Specification
Description
Best use
Backpacking
Self-inflating
Rectangular
Open-cell foam
5.6
No
Yes
6 x 25.5 / 4.75 x 21.25 / 4 x 21.25 inches
78 / 72 / 48 inches
26 / 20 / 20 inches
1.75 / 1.75 / 1.75 inches
78 x 26 x 1.75 / 72 x 20 x 1.75 / 48 x 20 x 1.75 inches
198 x 66 x 4 / 183 x 51 x 4 / 122 x 51 x 4 centimeters
3 lbs. 3 oz. / 2 lbs. 8 oz. / 1 lb. 10 oz.
1.44 / 1.13 / 0.74 kilograms
Unisex
Sleeping pad type
Sleeping pad shape
Insulation type
R-Value
Repair kit included
Stuff sack included
Packed size
Pad length (in.)
Pad width (in.)
Pad thickness (in.)
Dimensions
Dimensions - metric
Weight
Weight - metric
Gender

REI Trekker 1.75 Self-Inflating Pad

Loading Ratings & Reviews...

REI Trekker 1.75 Self-Inflating Padis rated4.0714out of5by14.
Rated5out of5byfromMust-have for cool weather campersGot this for my son, a cub scout about to cross over to boy scout. Boy scouts in our area camp out monthly, and an REI employee helped identify what gear would be critical for our first November (in Massachusetts) camping trip. This pad really helped keep my son warm and provided some padding as well. It ended up raining and snowing during the trip, but my son was warm all night, thanks, in part, to this excellent pad.
Date published: 2013-11-14
Rated3out of5byfromOK but puntures easilyDon't let it touch the ground or brush against anything even slightly sharp! A puncture will result. Instead of a 72" I am going with a 42" and carrying it inside of a 72" foam pad. I learned this after buying two 72" trekker pads and puncturing both with pine needles. I do still have a 72"x25" trekker that I use for sleeping in my SUV and as an extra mattress in the home for guests.
Date published: 2013-09-27
Rated5out of5byfromGets the job doneThis is the first sleeping pad I owe. Comparing to inflated mattress, this thing is MUCH better - smaller to pack, easily inflatable and comfort level is the same.
Date published: 2013-09-23
Rated4out of5byfromDurable pad that is great for campingI purchased three of the regular 1.75 self-inflating pads in 2012. My family and I have used the pads extensively for multi-week tent camping trips, multi-week backpacking trips, and long weekend backpacking trips. My son has also used the pads for week-long overnight summer camps (cabins/open-air shelters). The pads are highly durable and for that reason alone I will buy them again if just for tent camping. In the past, I had purchased air mattresses for tent camping trips that broke after a few nights. These pads have worked every time without incident. When tent camping, and in no particular rush, I have left the pad to self-inflate on its own time. When backpacking, after a long day, I prefer to help the pad along by blowing air into the nozzle. Comfort aside, I plan to switch to a lighter and more compact sleeping pad for backpacking trips. The rolled up pad takes up too much space on the outside of my pack and weighs more than I prefer to carry.
Date published: 2013-08-18
Rated4out of5byfromgreat sleeping padgreat pad for motorcycling. Inflates very quickly. You must insure the valve is completely closed to prevent air loss. Would like to see 22" pad for a bit wider sleeping area.
Date published: 2013-08-14
Rated5out of5byfromGlad I purchased it!I needed a pad to sleep on a hard church floor for 9 days on a youth mission trip. It was perfect! It stayed inflated and the inch or so of inflation was just enough. I didn't have to deal with a bulky air mattress that tends to lose air. The only down side was it didn't self inflate as advertised, but it was quite easy to blow up.
Date published: 2013-07-26
Rated5out of5byfromVery ComfortableWorks as described. An REI employee said to inflate the pad upon getting it home, leave it inflated overnight, then deflate it, roll it up for a day or two and re-inflate it to make sure it self-inflates before taking it camping. She also said to blow a few breaths in to get it fully inflated, and to store it inflated at home. When I slept on it, it stayed inflated all night, and is more comfortable than a foam mat and all the air mattresses I've tried. Thank you REI for having helpful employees and products that work!
Date published: 2013-07-23
Rated4out of5byfromas comfy as can be for size and weightI now own the 3.5, the 2.5, AND the 1.75, so I probably make a good reviewer for this pad. The 3.5 is incredibly comfortable, and although I have read that it leaks, I have never put a hole in one, and have used it thoroughly. I weigh 135 pounds, though. I'm sure that your weight makes a difference. It is also VERY VERY heavy and large, and in my view, impossible to use as a backpacking pad. Only for car camping or home use, etc. The 2.5 is also VERY comfortable, and is just barely acceptable for backpacking in a situation where you can justify it's size and weight. I would go for this if I could, as I do value comfort over minimalism in some situations. The 1.75 Trekker is well named. It is the smallest, most practical version of these pads. This is pretty much the one I would take backpacking. It is actually very comfortable. I will say that I am VERY careful not to expose my pads to making holes in them. I use not only a footprint for all tents, but another packable tarp to put under that also. I do this as another barrier to inevitable holes if you don't, and for rain and mud. Perhaps I'm wrong, but then I have so many inflatable pads of different brands and sizes, and NEVER have I put a single hole in any of them. There MUST be a reason for that, as I really am an avid adventurer and extreme backpacker all the time. For more extreme conditions than the ultra-babying that I always do with my pads (like alpine mountaineering) where you are setting up over un-level rocks and other features, OF COURSE an inflatable pad is NOT the choice. It only makes sense to NOT use ANY inflatable pad for extreme situations where obviously ALL inflatable pads would be in danger of getting a hole in it. When do you EVER see a video of someone mountaineering with an inflatable pad? Also, for a huge adventure, I would consider that you are setting up over hole making features all the time, and opt for a non-inflatable pad for that. I would never consider, nor would anyone else, to use a blow up pad for alpine mountaineering or other situations where you depend on your pad to keep warm and comfy to keep you alive. There MUST be a reason others have plenty of reviews saying that these pads will get a hole and leak, and that I have NEVER put a hole in ANY brand of pad. Also, if you DID get 2 years of good service out of an inflatable mattress before getting holes, I'd say that's pretty good considering the nature of a blow up pad. I LOVE the self-inflating feature, as blowing up a pad (or MORE than 1!) that is non-inflatable in my opinion is HORRIBLE. Who wants to sit there and blow up a pad and run short of breath for 10 minutes? It's MUCH easier to let the pads inflate on their own. There is NOTHING to complain about there being a couple of breaths left to blow into it at the end to finish filling the pad with air. That is only ridiculous wining. ALL self inflating pads need that, but it's either 100 breaths that will wear you out, or just a couple that are no big deal.
Date published: 2013-06-29

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