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What is this mushroom?

Does anybody out there know their mushrooms? I came across these over the weekend. They remind me quite a lot of a smurf village, for some reason. I've been going nuts trying to ID the species. Do they look familiar to anyone?

For the record, I did not pick them (Leave No Trace!) and have no intention of eating them. I'm just curious about the id.

Tree-13.jpg

 

10 Replies

@Bonfire @TomIrvine @Philreedshikes @Gary2 @SeattleBen @existentialist 

You all have chimed in on threads about picking mushrooms...now is your moment! Any ideas on what these might be?

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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Looks kinda like a fairly ring 

 

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I’m not sure, but it could be a rare ‘Baked Omlette Orangee’

REI Member Since 1979 YouTube.com/philreedshikes

When I was out there looking at it, I thought Smurf village. Now that I am looking at the photo I’m thinking “so that’s how hamburger buns are grown!” 

Yeah. I was thinkin' hamburger bun too.

I'm not quite the expert you might think I am, but they look a little too beefy for fairy-rings, and it looks like they might grow in "bouquets" or bunches.

The picture doesn't give enough info for me. It would be good to see more of the stem, the spore-bearing surfaces (gills or tubes or teeth), and get a spore-print.

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They do indeed grow in clumps, not fairy rings. That said, I can always go take more photos! But what si a spore print?

 

Angie

A spore print will give you the color of the spores (sort of the mushroom's seeds). It's easy to make. Snip the stem and put the cap gill side down on a piece of paper. Add a drop of water to the cap and cover it with a cup or bowl. If it's a not too young, not too old specimen, after a while (say, overnight) you will get a print of what looks like an image of the gills. 

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APM, run the photo through the AI algo at iNaturalist.org. You can also download the app. Even when it misidentifies stuff you can learn things. 

Without seeing the stem and underside of the cap it's hard to ID a mushie, but I'll venture a guess at Desarmillaria caespitosa, a.k.a. the ringless honey mushroom. 

By the way, a mushroom is more like an apple than a tree. If you don't damage the underground mycelium or take so many that spores don't get a chance to spread, it's unlikely you're harming the environment, so I've read and been told.

I've read the same information jonb. David Arora, the Moses of fungophiles.

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.