I need help & confidence on choosing a storage system for my Mad River canoe. Bought it used, 16 ft long, 36 in wide. 

The reviews on many different hoist systems are ALL OVER THE PLACE. This will be hanging over my cars & where my children play - so need it to be 100%.

Any suggestions?

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That's how mine hangs, over my wife's car.  Smiley Wink  Homemade block and tackle.  Single gang pulley on each end, top one screwed into the rafter studs.  For maximum lifting advantage, tie the standing end to the top pully, run it down to the lower one (fastened to straps around the canoe), back up to the upper pulley, then down where you can pull on it.  You get a 50% mechanical advantage for each moving strand.  Also, don't make the same mistake I did and use a thin rope even if it'll hold the weight!  My first one was too thin to get a grip on;  had to replace it with a thicker one I could easily grasp.  I tie the running end to the forward and rear gunnels.  Also, if I'm hoisting it alone, I have to take her up in stages, fore and aft, to keep it from slipping out of the straps.

Retired medical technologist and engineer
REI member since 1978
Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.

Here's the world's crudest diagram for the DIY setup that we put together on a covered floating dock:

Outer frame (black) is the building structure (in our case, the frame of the covered dock). Canoe (grey) is upside down, with two compression straps (black ovals) looped around ends and each connected to a pulley (blue circles). Two more pulleys (blue circles at top) are fixed to the frame above (our are strapped, but could easily be bolted to a ceiling joist). Finally, two lengths of 1/4" nylon rope (red lines) are fixed to the same anchor point at the pulleys, go down and through the canoe strap pulleys, up and through the fixed ceiling pulleys, and then down to the wall where they are fixed to wall-mounted rope cleats (blue curves on sides).

Picture1.png

Obviously, this setup works best with two people, but even solo, I typically lower one end half way, lower the other end all the way down, then go back to the first end to finish up. This very basic block/tackel system is easy enought o use without too much strength, and it stows away with a very low profile.  

Hope this helps!

Doesn't look crude to me!  Nicely done. Looks like you copied my arrangement!   Your picture is work all my words, and more. Smiley Very Happy

Retired medical technologist and engineer
REI member since 1978
Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.
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Hmmm... So what I sense I that neither of your just bought a pre-made hoist system. Shoot! I was hoping it wad a super easy solution. Im being totally lazy. 

Both explanations helped and the visual cemented it. It looks kind of easy enough.

Thanks, All!

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The components for the pully systems were way less expensive than assembled ones.  My wife says I'm cheap.  I prefer to think of it as a problem in optimization.  How do I get out of this and retain the maximum amount of cash!  Plus it's super simple to assemble. 

Retired medical technologist and engineer
REI member since 1978
Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.
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