One person sure, but encouraging the culture of responsible geotagging when there are too many hiking social media accounts to count is the idea. There very popular hiking dog instagram accounts and one with over a million followers geotagged my groomer and my vet here in the Denver area. Haha, I couldn't get a groom in for 2 months after that. That's just an example of one influencer geotagging one thing that is only relevant to people within a 20 or so minute radius of us. A lot of those accounts used to geotag hiking trails, though most have stopped or only geotag vague information.

There are plenty cautionary tales of natural spots being ruined by overuse and notoriously geotagged on social media - a recent one was the closure of Max Patch in the Smoky Mountains. Each person sets an example, and then it becomes a culture.

Reading the original post, i thought, "Who is running the show and what are they doing to manage the crowds?"  This is the paradox of park or protected area management - you want visitors, but all too often too many visitors damage and degrade the resource.

You can educate and encourage proper behavior, but eventually you will probably have limits on visitation......trail quotas for Mt. Whitney, for example.

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At the particular park I mentioned, there are signs telling people to be quiet, not to bring pets, and to walk, not run or ride bikes. But, apart from signs, there's not much. 

Not everywhere does want visitors though. At least not as much. Some places are deliberately managed not to encourage lots of visitors. In this regard, wildlife refuges out west come to mind. There are huge spaces kept undeveloped with no infrastructure so that you really have to make an effort to get in and out. You can't just drive up or walk a mile and be in.

Angie

good points, I agree.  Same for the Dolly Sods wilderness

DSC02084 + reduced.jpgDSC02143 + reduced.jpgDSC02392 + reduced.jpg

REI Member Since 1979 YouTube.com/philreedshikes

I should probably clarify, those pics NOT dolly sods, wv, lol

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I agree with @archaeopteryx. But even for people without huge followings on social media, word still spreads. Someone shares your neat photo. Then someone else does. You just never know how far an image can go and it can go quite far. 

Several of us on these forums are also publishing our photos. If you're doing that, then the impact--and therefore the need to be responsible--is all the greater because, by definition, you are putting your images in a places where they will be widely seen.

Unfortunately, many of us unwitting share that information anyway if you happen to have smartphone or fancier camera.  There are ways to remove this, including some apps.  I think it is very important to know not just for saving your favorite outdoor locations, but even posting photos taken around your house.

"GPS coordinates are stored as “metadata” embedded in the photo files themselves. All you have to do is view the file’s properties and look for it...

In Windows, all you have to do is right-click a picture file, select “Properties,” and then click the “Details” tab in the properties window. Look for the Latitude and Longitude coordinates under GPS.

In macOS, right-click the image file (or Control+click it), and select “Get Info.” You’ll see the Latitude and Longitude coordinates under the “More Info” section"

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For a lot of purposes, that kind of metadata, including the date, is extremely useful

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I recently viewed the National Park Service video for visitors with permits for the White Rim Road.  I was interested to see that it contains a request not to share location data along with the usual leave-no-trace advice.  I would say that's pretty convincing evidence that location sharing causes real headaches for park managers. 

https://www.nps.gov/nps-audiovideo/legacy/cany/DB669631-C286-30C7-044E3F0227860EC1/cany-02-WhiteRimD...

Why post the picture in the first place, with or without locational information?  What purpose does posting serve?  Is it not enough to experience nature's bounty yourself? 

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