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Minimum/maximum Seat height on Co-op cycles kids bike

Can you please tell me the minimum and maximum seat height for your Co-op cycles REV CTY step through kids bike in 24 inches and the Co-op cycles REV 24 plus kids bike in 24 inches? My son has an inseam of 23.5 inches and is 54 inches tall. Can you suggest any bikes that are in stock or have a short backorder time? Thanks !

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@ES808 Thanks for reaching out!

Based on the measurements you have given us, it sounds like your son is right there at the top of the scale for a 20" bike and just at the beginning stages of fitting a 24" bike. The 24" bikes we carry by Co-op Cycles, Salsa, and Cannondale fit a height range of kids from 46" to around 60". So, in terms of seat height, you should be good to go there. The real concern is going to be the standover height. Here is the rundown of 24" bikes we carry and their standover height:

This is going to mean that your son will be at the very minimum of clearance over the bar, which will likely result in some awkward dismounts and potentially some challenges getting started at first, depending on his experience on a bike. If he is an active rider without training wheels and needs simply to upgrade his size, then you should be totally fine with one of these 24" bikes.

If he is a beginning rider, or not quite fully confident in his riding abilities, then you may want to consider starting with a smaller bike at first and working up to a bike this big as he gains confidence and ability. As an example, the Salsa Timberjack 20 SUS Plus Kid's Bike fits a height range of 49" - 57" with a standover height of 18.4". Likewise, the Co-op Cycles REV 20 6 Speed Kid's Bike fits the same height range and has a standover height of 20.5". Ultimately, you know your son and his abilities best. At this time, it appears as though all of these 24" bikes are currently in stock.

Hopefully this helps, thanks!

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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@ES808  Great question!

No, standover height is different that minimum seat height. Standover height refers to the height of the top tube (the tube running from under the seat to the handlebars) from the ground. Another way to think about it is the height of the bike if you leave the saddle/seat and stand over the frame of the bike with your feet on the ground.

All of that is to say, that the 'minimum seat height' is not typically listed as a measurement for bikes as it depends greatly on the frame style and length of the seat post. The minimum seat height will always be several inches higher than the standover height. If you want your son to be able to sit on the seat and easily touch the ground with his feet then you will likely need to go with one of the 20" bikes. 

As an example to illustrate: my daughter is 50" tall and has an inseam measurement of right about 22.5". She rides a Salsa Timberjack 20 Plus bike with the seat about 2" above its minimum. When sitting in the saddle, she can touch the ground with her 'tippy toes'. When she comes to a stop she has just enough reach to put her foot down and balance. To translate that to your son's experience, he would likely easily fit a 20" bike in that style. It would definitely be a stretch for him on a 24" bike. 

Hopefully that answers the question for you!

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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3 Replies

@ES808 Thanks for reaching out!

Based on the measurements you have given us, it sounds like your son is right there at the top of the scale for a 20" bike and just at the beginning stages of fitting a 24" bike. The 24" bikes we carry by Co-op Cycles, Salsa, and Cannondale fit a height range of kids from 46" to around 60". So, in terms of seat height, you should be good to go there. The real concern is going to be the standover height. Here is the rundown of 24" bikes we carry and their standover height:

This is going to mean that your son will be at the very minimum of clearance over the bar, which will likely result in some awkward dismounts and potentially some challenges getting started at first, depending on his experience on a bike. If he is an active rider without training wheels and needs simply to upgrade his size, then you should be totally fine with one of these 24" bikes.

If he is a beginning rider, or not quite fully confident in his riding abilities, then you may want to consider starting with a smaller bike at first and working up to a bike this big as he gains confidence and ability. As an example, the Salsa Timberjack 20 SUS Plus Kid's Bike fits a height range of 49" - 57" with a standover height of 18.4". Likewise, the Co-op Cycles REV 20 6 Speed Kid's Bike fits the same height range and has a standover height of 20.5". Ultimately, you know your son and his abilities best. At this time, it appears as though all of these 24" bikes are currently in stock.

Hopefully this helps, thanks!

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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Thank you John, very helpful ! Question: is the standover height the same as the minimum seat height ?

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@ES808  Great question!

No, standover height is different that minimum seat height. Standover height refers to the height of the top tube (the tube running from under the seat to the handlebars) from the ground. Another way to think about it is the height of the bike if you leave the saddle/seat and stand over the frame of the bike with your feet on the ground.

All of that is to say, that the 'minimum seat height' is not typically listed as a measurement for bikes as it depends greatly on the frame style and length of the seat post. The minimum seat height will always be several inches higher than the standover height. If you want your son to be able to sit on the seat and easily touch the ground with his feet then you will likely need to go with one of the 20" bikes. 

As an example to illustrate: my daughter is 50" tall and has an inseam measurement of right about 22.5". She rides a Salsa Timberjack 20 Plus bike with the seat about 2" above its minimum. When sitting in the saddle, she can touch the ground with her 'tippy toes'. When she comes to a stop she has just enough reach to put her foot down and balance. To translate that to your son's experience, he would likely easily fit a 20" bike in that style. It would definitely be a stretch for him on a 24" bike. 

Hopefully that answers the question for you!

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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