cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Announcements
Welcome REI Co-op Members!
We're glad you're here. If you can't access the Co-op Members section of the community,
click here for instructions on how to join the section that's just for you.

Co-op Ebike vs. Ride1Up LMT'D

I'm planning to buy an e-bike for my son. I'm comparing the Co-op CTY 2.2 to the Ride1Up LMT'D. The latter is lower cost, class 3, and higher power/speed, but I'm wondering what folks here think. I like the Co-op because REI stands behind it and provides service. Are there other pros?

0 Likes
2 Replies

Hi @jamesv,

Ultimately, the decision comes down to how the bike will be used by the rider. If the power of a Class 3 system is most important due to the rider's preference, commute, etc., then the Ride1Up could be a better choice. If Class 1 pedal assist is sufficient enough, and you place value on the bike being fully serviced by REI, then the CTY e2.2 might be the way to go.

As you decide, note that there are often state, local, and/or municipal restrictions on e-bikes. For example, some localities only allow Class 3 bikes to legally operate on roadways, and do not allow them on pedestrian or bike trails at all. In Colorado, where I live, you must be 16-years-old to legally operate a Class 3 bike, and are required to operate it with a helmet if you are under 18.

You're also correct that we stand behind our products! With every bike purchase through REI, including with the CTY e2.2, you qualify for one year of free adjustments through your new bike's break-in period. These include derailleur and brake adjustments, lateral wheel truing, hub and headseat bearing adjustments, tire inflation and chain lubrication. 

It is well to note that our shops offer full support for three e-bike motor systems: Bosch, Stromer, and Shimano STePS. (The CTY e2.2 has a Shimano STePS Class 1 motor.) All other e-bike motor systems, including the MXUS on the Ride1Up, are serviced at the discretion of the technicians at your local REI Co-Op shop. You might give your local store a call and see if they'll service the MXUS system as part of your shopping process. 

As a member, regardless of which bike you choose, you'll receive 10% off of our shop services, even for a bike not purchased by REI. In the case of the Ride1Up, our shops may still service the non-drivetrain components of the bike, such as the brakes and wheels, even if they cannot service the motor. 

I hope this gives you food for thought! If you have more questions, you can drop them here for the community, or ask the folks at your local REI. Good luck on your search!

 

 

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
0 Likes

My reply would start out asking a question:  would this be your first eBike purchase?  Have you ridden a friends eBike, or rented one to ride it more than a round the block demo?

I purchased a $1,049 Stealth KBO Hurricane because there were no eBikes I could rent and none of my friends had one to try.  After 15 minutes of unpacking and assembly I went for a 6 mile ride without using the electrical motor, that short trip provided the knowledge if I ran out of battery power I could ride the 36 pound bicycle home. I fully charged the battery that evening and the next day went for a 32 mile ride in level 1 of 3 power levels. I have not run out of battery power with my maximum ride distance of 38 miles. 

I never ride in power level 3 (maximum assist) but my single speed belt drive 250 watt hub motor is cadence sensing and not very good on hills, or long gentle inclines where my pedal speed slows.  Cadence sensing has no understanding you want more power assist when climbing a incline, All cadence systems understand is Oh, rider wants less power assist when your cadence/pedal speed slows.  Some bicycles are sold with a Torque Sensor  instead of a cadence sensor.  Torque Sensing lets the motor understand from pedal pressure how much power assist you need/want.  I do not believe either of these bicycle have that hill climbing feature.  

The shifting controls for the 8 or 9 speed of both bicycles will let you keep your cadence higher when encountering an incline, something to master quickly if you want to power up a hill under assist or throttle.   See which shifters you like the most or can use better on the two bicycles. 

My eBike two cents

JR

 

0 Likes