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Using Yeti Goal Zero system for long distance route while bikepacking?

I'm someone who is very active despite being plus sized. Backpacking, while I would love to do it is not possible due to medical reasons - and technology restraints. I bikepack, but unfortunately I'm limited from going one campground to another, as I need electricity to power my equipment. I would like to see or even volunteer to participate to see the capability of the Goal Zero system with a burley single track style trailer and someone/me ride the continental divide or some kind of long distance route (more than a 2 day charge) to prove its capability to not only power your medical needs, but function as a bikepacking option. How can we make this happen so it can encourage other people like me to not feel limited by their medical conditions.

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Right off the bat, there would be a pretty significant weight penalty - at least twelve pounds for the smallest Yeti.  How much power is needed?

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.
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It depends on the medical equipment. I would say the 1500. That's why you would need the burley trailer. I feel that showing that it's possible, despite the not so optimal set up is really key here.

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I believe the 1500 weighs 45 pounds.  Th rest of your gear will run about the same - total around 90 pounds, plus the bike and trailer. What do you do if some key component of all this gear fails to perform, rendering you immobile?

Idon't know what medical equipment is involved, and that is somewhat irrelevant, but you should be thinking about, and planning for, worse case scenarios.

"If anything can happen, it will..."

 

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.
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This is why you would need to utilize a trailer. It would keep the weight off of the frame of the bike. I may have the wrong model of yeti. I have pulled 100 lbs on a bike. It's difficult, but not impossible. I carry all the basic equipment necessary for repairs and survival. The battery in question needs to be able to hold at least a 3 night charge and preferably utilize a solar panel to prove its worth. If my cheap mountain bike can pull that kind of weight in a 2 day ride, I'm confident that a real one (maybe a gearbox design for even less maintenance issues) would work. Especially with appropriate equipment to actually bikepack.

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