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Backpacking Overseas - airport tips?

Sooner or later, I plan on going on a backpacking trip across Japan, and I have already mapped out my route as well as campsites. I am not used to Overseas Backpacking, as I have only done it here(U.S.). How could I bring my backpacking supplies through the Airport? Should I put all my metal/dangerous objects in my carry on bag and then keep my actual backpack in the check in?

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@SuperTokyo 

While it's not about international travel, we did recently have a thread about traveling with your backpacking gear. You can check it out over here: What backpacking gear is allowable for Airplane Travel? Additionally, we spoke with one of our employees who has traveled to Japan, he says that the restrictions on items for international travel are going to be very similar to the ones for domestic flights (He also recommends checking out the Discover Japan Program from ANA for good deals on tickets). That being said, you'll want to check in with your airline before your trip to be sure about what items may be restricted.

Hopefully this helps, thanks!

At REI, we believe time outside is fundamental to a life well lived.
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The airlines will usually "guarantee" what's in your luggage, not the luggage itself.  That said, if your pack is your luggage and it gets destroyed, you may be out of luck.  If you swing by a Goodwill or similar and grab some "luggage" that your pack fits in and.it gets destroyed, it may save you some trouble.

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@nathanu 

Great idea. What do you do with the "luggage" when you arrive so you can use it again on the flight home? In my experience the cost of storage at airports and rail stations can be prohibitive for longer periods.

Incidentally airline policies vary. For instance my REI rolling luggage bag got torn while flying on Icelandair to Germany. The bag had been on sale for ~$125. They compensated me $75 to get it repaired. I managed to repair it myself with duct tape. It's still going strong. (Well it was in pre-pandemic times.)

...Wanderer


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Just drop it off at the nearest Goodwill at your destination.  They'll either hild it for you for cheap (you can buy it back) or they'll sell you a cheap replacement. 🙂

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.

to add on what the others are saying, to your point, anything metal/ dangerous, you actually want to CHECK it.  If you don't, and its questionable at the security check, you'll most likely lose the item.

An extreme example, people legitimately check in guns when transporting their weapons.  But of course would not be able to carry on with them on the plane.

hope that gives some idea what's possible.

My information is rather dated, coming from 1961 when I was serving in Korea, but on a brief R and R to Japan, I was trying to make a winter ascent of Mt. Fuji.  Everything I needed, including crampons and ice axe was readily available in sporting goods in downtown Tokyo.

I suspect that any items lost or stolen while in transit could be readily obtained in Japan.

My trip was a wonderful experience.  Yours will be the same, I am sure....

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.

Hi @SuperTokyo .

You definitely want to CHECK your metal/"dangerous" items.  Trekking poles, for example, are prohibited in carry-on luggage.

This Osprey Airporter  would be a good option for you.  You put your backpack inside it to protect the straps, etc. and upon arrival, it folds up to be placed inside the backpack. 

https://www.rei.com/product/887944/osprey-airporter-lz-medium

For the same reason, I would also suggest something like this Sea-to-Summit packable pack as a carry on for your necessities on the plane, while waiting in the airport, etc.  

https://www.rei.com/product/136763/sea-to-summit-ultra-sil-travel-day-pack

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.

I used to be stationed in Japan and found traveling through the airports was much like in the US (Just different language).  I would get a heavy duty army/navy duffle and stuff the backpack and items in there. You can get them cheap at a surplus store.  Then check that bag.  That way if anything gets tore its something you dont plan to keep anyway.  One item I would strongly recommend is touching base with your camping site manager before you go.  We often climbed Mt. Fuji and on two occasions tried to stay at a campground to only find out that they did not want foreigner customers.  Better to know where you can stay before you travel.   Good luck and if you get the chance to climb fuji ....take it 🙂 

Superusers do not speak on behalf of REI and may have received
one or more gifts or other benefits from the co-op.
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