Wild Ideas Worth Living Transcript: Gabby Reece

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[Intro music]

Shelby Stanger:

Today's guest is fitness expert, mom, wife, author, speaker, TV host, badass Gabby Reece. Welcome to Wild Ideas Worth Living, an adventure podcast presented by REI Co-op, the brand who helps get you outside through gear, classes, and adventures. We talk to experts who have taken a wild idea and made it a reality so you can to, from people who have climbed the tallest peaks, started thriving businesses, and even broken records. Some of the wildest ideas can lead to the most rewarding adventures. I'm your host, Shelby Stanger, and I hope you enjoy this show. Gabby Reece is a serious badass. She's also someone I've looked up to for a long time, ever since I was a teen. I actually wrote a few stories for magazines on her when I was in my 20s. The former professional volleyball player, Gabby is also a bestselling author, announcer, fitness model.

She's the first female athlete on Nike to design a shoe. She's done a bunch of TV shows. She's the founder of HighX Training and co-founder of XPT. She's a mom, and stepmom, and she's the wife of big wave surfer Laird Hamilton. This is a little different podcast then a few of mine. Instead of focusing on her wild idea, I asked Gabby for life advice on health, nutrition, training, and we even get into relationships. She's incredibly honest, intuitive, and Gabby just knows her stuff. A good friend who heard this early said, it's one of the best podcast she's listened to so far. I hope you enjoy this. We get into some funny stuff at first, including what a colema board is, but we quickly dived into how to cut the BS in your life, how to train smarter, how to rest, how to find balance, and how to live more wildly. Enjoy.

Also, just a quick note, we're not doctors, and don't play one on the podcast. Before trying anything health related, consult your doctor, or medical professional, enjoy the show. All right, Gabby Reece, welcome to Wild Ideas Worth Living.

Gabby Reece:

Thank you. You've already had your first adventure getting to my house.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, we wind up the canyon through Malibu and the winds are like 90 miles and hour.

Gabby Reece:

We have 75 mile an hour gust, and it seems to be steady at 60.

Shelby Stanger:

That's good.

Gabby Reece:

We're glad you made it.

Shelby Stanger:               

A little Prius tin can is not going to blow away, I hope. Well, I thought we should start with ... You've had such a wild career, doing so many different things, we talked, when we met at The Inertia, we talked a lot about fitness, and tactics, and ways to biohack your body. I thought maybe you could just tell me some of the things you do now that you find most useful on training, and keeping your body so damn fit for so long, and continuing to keep it fit.

Gabby Reece:                  

Well, I will say that just from a really basic point of view, you start to realize that food is probably like 80% of the gig, really. I think as I've gone through all of this, in like all kinds of training, we've got the underwater training, and breathing, and I do circuits, and mobility, and all these different things, then, you start getting to, "Oh, every single thing I drink and eat will have the greatest impact on me besides my ability to deal with stress, pretty much, and sleep." This serves some cross sections on things. I'd say, and it's so really basic, it's keeping ... eating just real food. I don't need to get into vegan versus meat eating. I personally eat high quality animal proteins. Other people, and I think there's a lot to be said for a vegan diet. As long as it's not ... you're getting ... compensating with these highly manufactured foods, with a lot of sugar.

Shelby Stanger:               

You can be a total junk food vegan.

Gabby Reece:                  

Really radical. I think as long as it's ... I think it's like the Republicans and the Democrats, and that really if you took both, they probably majority meet in the middle on most things. Then, you've got the extremes on either end, kind of creating a lot of noise. I think most of us can agree that if we can eat real food better ... and even Laird, when we're here and if we can get it on Kauai, we have unpasteurized milk, and butter. If you're going to eat dairy, let's say that you just eat the highest quality, and I know a lot of people are afraid of that, but for me, personally, I'd rather have that than something that's been pasteurized. Again, the sugar is just the ... I think it's the king killer on so many levels, besides weight, and inflammation, and disease feeding.

I think it's the hardest thing, because it's in everything. It's so addicting, but it's the thing that I find. I have the greatest immediate impact on the way I look and feel when I keep that down to a minimum. I'll always start with that. People talk about biohacking, I will always start really with the food, and periodic fasting is very, very smart. If you can eat dinner at six and not eat till 12:00 or 1:00, I think it's really, really great to give your digestion a break. Another thing I've done that might be a little extreme for people, but it's interesting, and is really impactful is, we have a colema board.

Shelby Stanger:

A what?

Gabby Reece:

Colema board, which is different ... I know we torture each other. No, it's different than getting a colonic. I was tapped by a woman named Eden years ago, and it's basically a flat board that has this whole ... you put up to your toilet, and it has a glass tube, and five gallons of water, that it's gravity fed. It's not hard. It's not high pressure. What you do is you eat for three or four days before, pretty soft. Not animal protein, not dairy.

Shelby Stanger:

Steamed veggies?

Gabby Reece:

Or soup would be better.

Shelby Stanger:

Okay.

Gabby Reece:

So that you just give your colon and your digestion a minute. Then, after about three or four days of that, you start popping on the colema board and stay with the liquids or soft. You can do seven days to 10 days. What you do is you lay there, it takes about 50 minutes, or to an hour, and you excavate your colon.

Shelby Stanger:               

Is it like a jacuzzi for your a-hole?

Gabby Reece:                  

Well, it is, but your length on your back, and without getting too gross, I know it freaks everybody else, especially, no offense, but the boys don't love the idea of, "What do you do with the glass tube?" Well, it's very tiny. You barely feel it, and it just goes a quarter of an inch in your rectum, and it naturally, the water goes in and comes out, and whatever comes out, comes out, and go straight into the toilet. The interesting thing about it is, you'll hear people say, "Hey, our bodies are meant to detox themselves." And they are absolutely correct. The notion of detoxing is, there's probably a lot of weird stuff around that, so I'm not denying that, but the idea of excavating your colon, so we've done it before, and on the eighth day or so, the woman would put a screen underneath, and she'd say, "Do you want to say what's coming out of your colon?"

It's like little green stones, all these stuff that's impacting your colon. What happens? You do that once in a while, and you have the ability to absorb nutrients on a greater level. I always joke that every toxic relationship you get out of, all your bad friends, you break up with them, after you're on the colema board, because you have a different clarity, inflammation, all these things. If somebody could get informed about a colema board, it is different than a colonic. It's astounding, like after you're on the board for six or seven days, when you first get on, the water goes in and out, in and out. Well, when you're on it, on the sixth and seventh day, the water can go in for 10 minutes before it comes out, because it's going all the way now up into the colon. That has been something that was really interesting, and I've shared this with a few friends that had really incredible results with it.

I really like the colema board. You just have to use it correctly, highly sanitized, gloves, alcohol, it's not a game. New tips, obviously, every time. That is one sort of, if you said to me, cheating, biohacking, I would definitely call that one. Even for girl's cellulite, because it's inflammation, the appearance of cellulite improves things like that. That's my, probably, my greatest cheat besides the really obvious stuff, which is, I think I probably handle a lot of things at one time very well. I think sports really help me to have the ability to focus on what needed to be focused on at that moment, and not react to every single thing that's happening at once. Laird is like the Gestapo about getting to bed. If it was me, I'd probably go to bed closer to 10:30 or 11:00, because I'd have stuff to do, because I'm a mom, and a wife, and a business person. He is always pulling everyone to bed, to get us into bed by 9:00.

Shelby Stanger:               

That's nice.

Gabby Reece:

I think it's right.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah. Isn't there a science that says that men have the highest amount of testosterone who go to bed between like 8:00 and 10:00 p.m.?

Gabby Reece:                  

Yes, and even like they say, depending on your circadian rhythm, that you can get two times the bang for your buck for every hour before midnight. Because you know you figure your cortisol levels and things like that, so your highest amount of recovery and hormone production and things like that. I even found out, we did a test with this company, we even have test for our friends, where they ... with fitness jeans, where they'll tell you, like, for me, I meant to sleep ... I don't sleep as well, but for longer period of time, and Laird sleeps a shorter period of time, but very deeply, like you're genetically predisposed. Anyway, going back to biohacking, with people, I say, don't over complicate it, because that in itself can become a job. About like, "Well, should I take this now, or should I take it before, or 20 minutes before I work out, or 15 minutes before bed, or on an empty stomach?"

It's like, oh my gosh, because everything has to be sustainable, everything. Any lifestyle habit that we're incorporating has to be something that is realistic, either to our time, or our pocketbook, or other, or just who we are as people, like, "I hate doing that." "Well, okay, how long is that going to last?" For me, it's the food, and then, movement. I try to pick things that I like, but I also try to change it up a little, because I'm a really bad creature of habit. Laird is the opposite. He would rather do something different all the time, which is better for you. He's more artistic and I'm very linear.

Shelby Stanger:

I am, too. I'd rather run every single day.

Gabby Reece:                   Ye

ah, but also runners are different. I think they're runners. You know the goals of runner's high, and I'm like, "Yeah, no. What we've probably come to figure out is that they're just breathing a lot."

Shelby Stanger:               

That's interesting.

Gabby Reece:                  

You could, on your days, for my runners out there, if you're really on the road, or doing something and you don't get your run-in, if you spend 30 minutes diligently breathing, super ventilating, breathing in two times to one time out through your mouth, like in sucking like, do minutes of that, then, switch over to your nose, and then, you can do big oxygenation through your nose, you will be not only breaking carbon bonds, but you will be getting your "runner's high". Because your runner's high is technically, you're probably down regulating, you're probably moving into your parasympathetics, so when you're done, you're like, "Oh, I feel so good, and relaxed." Well, you've moved your body, which is important, but you've oxygenated your system and you've also gotten the other benefits from breathing.

Shelby Stanger:               

That's awesome. How do you move, and then, let's talk about the breathing, because we've had Wim Hof on, and Scott Carney, and [crosstalk 00:11:53].

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah, sure. Oh, great, Scott is amazing. Yeah.

Shelby Stanger:               

He was just here, but for his wife's Big Foot podcast.

Gabby Reece:

Oh, great.

Shelby Stanger:

He told me to give you a hug, he's like, "Gabby is great."

Gabby Reece:                  

No, he's so sweet. Yeah.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, he's a sweet dude. For your movement, how do you move? Do you do the pool workout?

Gabby Reece:                   S

ure, I do the pool three days a week.

Shelby Stanger:

The pool, just for those people who don't know, Gabby goes into a pool and trains with weights?

Gabby Reece:

Yeah. Well, we have different things. We have about 13 foot deep end, and you do a series of ballistic movements with dumb bells from the bottom to the top. Then, there's elements of swimming and breath holding, to increase your lung capacity, and your ability to deal with CO2. See, that's the other thing, when people get into breathing, they start thinking, "Oh, when I'm doing these breath holds, your apneas," which increases your CO2, they'll think, "oh, I'm out of air." They're not, they're actually having an intolerance to CO2. That hits you first. I'm not sure if Wim Hof discussed it, but I always talk about the science of breathing, and if we breathe through our nose, with the exception of like I'm sprinting, then, your CO2 can rise in your system. The only way for the oxygen that's in your bloodstream to go from your cells, excuse me, from your bloodstream to your cells, meaning, your mitochondria, and your tissue muscle, is the presence of CO2.

If we're all walking around mouth breathing, we actually never get that opportunity to absorb that oxygen or the benefits of that oxygen. I find it interesting, you'll see guys that are free divers, and they're scrubbing CO2, why? They override the impulse to breath, but that's not how we should be walking around in life. For runners, let's say, you go, "Well, I have to mouth breathe." In the beginning, if you slow down and nose breathe, what you'd find is you'd be pushing out your lactic acid, and you'd be recovering within your run because the oxygen would be going into your tissue. You'd actually, eventually, be able to run further, probably more effortlessly.

Shelby Stanger:

That's interesting, because I've been going all out trying to race my dude for 5K, because I also need [inaudible 00:13:59] as fast as me, and I don't like that.

Gabby Reece:

Okay.

Shelby Stanger:

We're racing, and at mile 2.7, I'd die, because I've been trying to keep a 6:30 pace, and I can't, not yet.

Gabby Reece:

Sure. Yeah, so slowdown in the beginning, and do the nose, in and out through the nose. What happens is you'll build moisture in your lungs, in your nasal passageway and this will, in fact, improve your capacity for nose breathing. Then, you'll start to understand, "Gosh, I'm not as tired." Because your muscles are having the chance to recover through the oxygen. For us, we do a combination of mouth breathing and nose breathing, but nose breathing is the king, and for living, or stress management, it's definitely the king. There's a time to mouth breathe, and what all people have to remember is, let's say you're highly stressed, so you hear box breathing, so you go seven in, seven hold, seven out, seven hold at the bottom. If you do that for three minutes or so, you'll begin to throw yourself, and you're parasympathetic, and relax. The other way people can do that is, let's say, for example, a five-second inhale, and a 10-second exhale.

When the exhale becomes longer than the inhale, you down regulate. They can do that for a couple of minutes. Conversely, I'm going to war, I'm going to play in a sport, I'm getting ramped up, I have a big meeting, so double up on the inhale to the exhale. Make the inhales longer than the exhales. It's a way to ramp up.

Shelby Stanger:

To de-stress, exhale longer.

Gabby Reece:

Longer, so five and 10.

Shelby Stanger:

Get pumped up. Okay.

Gabby Reece:

You would do more rigorous inhales.

Shelby Stanger:

I like this.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, so there's a great book by Patrick McKeown called The Oxygen Advantage, and it discusses your bold score, your CO2 tolerance. The thing I really love about breathing, and I've said this a lot, is you can do it anywhere and it's free, and I think it's really important. I think people are managing so many different things in their life, and it's a stressful world, everything is coming at everybody, especially for people who have less time or resources, they could utilize breathing as a way to support them in everything they're doing, and overall for their health. If you're oxygenating your system, now, you're creating less fertile ground for a lot of things. I think it's really important.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, I'm really into it. I have a friend writing a book about breathing only, and it's ... I can't wait for it come out. He also wrote a book about free-diving.

Gabby Reece:

I think the other thing, too, if you want to go to the next level, there's a woman I've been working with, and she does a lot of this apnea breathing, where it's like you're breathing in and holding your ribs up, and you're in these postures. Then, you exhale, and trying to keep your ribs lifted. Having the capacity to breath with your diaphragm, and especially for women, where they're not putting pressure on their uterus. For example, as we get older, and people go, "I'm incontinent." It's not that everything's just smashing down on them, or for women that let's say, for example, and this ... whatever, if they've just had children, sometimes, they can't enjoy sex the same. They've got to get everything up and open, and space, and they can do that by getting their ribs up and open, and they can use their intercostals, their breathing muscles more freely, and things like that. I think, also, when you start to really look into breathing, it's a pretty great tool.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, I want to go back to fasting, do you ever do just water fasting?

Gabby Reece:

Days and days?

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah.

Gabby Reece:

I've done a bit of fasting. I have a tendency to do, still with calories, so bone broths, things like that. I've never gone straight water, I think Laird has. Well, no, I just ... Again, my thing is this, who am I, and what do I think I can realistically do and manage? I'm not in competition with anyone. I probably am, but I'm trying really hard to look into my lane. I try to do that most times. If I said to Laird, "Oh, you want to fast? We're going to have air for 10 days." He'd be like, "Let's do it." I tried to pretend that I'm older, and wiser, and I think, "Well, I could do bone broths, and water, and things like that for a few days." Yeah, for sure.

Shelby Stanger:

I like this attitude of like, I'm a highly competitive person.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, I see that.

Shelby Stanger:

I want to be everybody-

Gabby Reece:

You should definitely sub-competing with your fiancé.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, it's terrible, but just running though.

Gabby Reece:                  

No, I'm serious.

Shelby Stanger:               

Really?

Gabby Reece:                  

I think in the long run ... There's always couples that can pull it.

Shelby Stanger:               

I love it.

Gabby Reece:                  

I've been with Laird for 23 years and here's what I know, if somehow it was pushing you both to a better place, in a better way, then, sure, it's great. If ultimately, there's a winner and a loser-

Shelby Stanger:               

Well, it's true.

Gabby Reece:                  

I don't know that that's better, but that's for each couple to decide.

Shelby Stanger:               

No, for me, it's just so exciting that he finally runs with me. I'm so excited. I feel like if I egg him on about the competition, he just keeps going with me to the track. He keeps going with me and runs, and it's so enjoyable, because he never used to run with me, we'd only surf together.

Gabby Reece:                  

Right.

Shelby Stanger:               

You're right, if I try and compete with him in the surf, it's just misery.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, I just think you have to know like, what does Laird always jokes with me, he's like, "Do you want to be right, or do you want to be happy?" He talks about with men, "Do you want to be right, or do you want to be happy?" I think there's something to be said for, if me pushing you, and nudging you is just making you better, and there's still a win-win in there, then, that's the right kind of competition. If somehow one of us is a loser and winner, or I'd have to get almost radical towards you to get you to perform, in the end, that's going to be a crisis.

Shelby Stanger:               

Okay, this is really good advice. I actually really want to talk to you about relationships, but before we go there, I thought we'd keep with the path of training, because you've also said something, when I met you at this amazing Inertia, of all event, about over training. You said, one of the things people do that's really a disservice is that they not only overtrain, but they train as a way to avoid things in their life. That really hit home at that time, it was summer, and I was running with a friend nine miles a day, and I'm not a long distance runner like that. I'm good at 5K, and I was crushing myself. I wasn't feeling good. I felt like, "Maybe I'm bored." I don't know, or maybe I'm just not wanting to do what's on my to-do list right now.

Gabby Reece:                  

I think we have to always, in appropriate amount, not overly, because I hate paralysis by over analysis, but check in. I think we have to at least be honest with ourselves and go, "Why am I really doing this?" I think if you go, "Hey, I'm stepping it up, and I'm increasing my work capacity." That's one thing. If I have so much stuff to do that I don't want to, or I have someone at my house that I live with, that I don't like, and I'm trying to stay out of the house, or if I am punishing myself because it's just that's what I do, I think you have to look at that. Because, again, I'm always thinking about the long game. How does everything I do serve the now and the long game? I believe in stepping it up, but there's a way to do that also without being miserable, and waking up each day.

I think it's also remembering that this stuff is all supposed to enhance you. Unless you're an Olympic athlete that it's all down to seconds and hundredths of a second, and this is this moment, I think if we're using training in our everyday life, it has to be something that we're creating stress, because that's important. It's important to put ourselves under stress, so we first of all have to face who we really are, but that's also how we stay strong. When people talk to me of biohacking, I'm like, "Yes, only to a point. Then, it's work." Does it have to be miserable work? No. Does it have to be hours and hours? No. Does it have to be consistent? It does. Does it have to real stress? It does. It's having enough of that work, so we've got that strength and we can make those changes.

Then, it's also about supporting ourself in love, in balance, in kindness, in how we move, and what we're doing, so that in the long run, we don't just fry out, or need a bottle of wine at the end of the day to decompress, because we're building this stress, and we don't really know what to do with it.

Shelby Stanger:               

Do you guys drink at all?

Gabby Reece:                  

I don't, no, and Laird doesn't drink, no. Laird can't drink, I could, he can't.

Shelby Stanger:               

Are you just ... your by choice sober, but-

Gabby Reece:                  

Listen, once every two or three months, I might have literally six ounces of red wine. Laird has to not drink. Well, 11 years ago, he just said, "Yeah, that's probably not going to work out." He stopped, we stopped all together. That was his path, and I think it's really normal when you have somebody with that high of an energy. It's just that they don't get to get it out as often as they would like to. The other thing I think I've learned in a real way about people who have addiction, addictive personalities, or addiction issues is they're probably really sensitive, and the world hits them in a way that it hurts in a different way, I think. A little distance from that, sometimes, is probably nice, because people go, "Oh." And I go, "Yeah." If you really look at all the people you know that battle that, they're pretty sensitive.

Shelby Stanger:               

Yeah, they're intuitive empaths. There's been so many people on this podcast who are sober, and it always fascinates me. I thought about it the other night, because I had a glass of wine, or two, at my high school reunion, and I felt terrible the next day. I was like, "Nothing good ever ... " I'm never like, "Hell, yeah, I'm so glad I drink last night."

Gabby Reece:                  

Oh, yeah.

Shelby Stanger:               

I'm usually like, "Hell, yeah, I'm glad I didn't."

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah. Well, I think, we always joke in the house, it's like, if there's someone who start their story like, "Whoa, you can't believe what happened." Laird is always like, "Stop right there, was alcohol involved?" I think for me, I grew up in the Caribbean, and all the adults around me drank a ton, and it was very destructive. If you ask me why I don't drink, it was more to that and also, I just never really gained the palate for it. I don't have a moral issue with it, it's just, I always think of it as really odd that everyone's like completely comfortable with alcohol, and then, somehow, it's like, "CBD and marijuana." That's so weird to me.

Shelby Stanger:               

So weird.

Gabby Reece:                  

As a person who is non-biased to either of it, I'm like, one seems like poison, where people fight, and drive like lunatics, and get frisky, and one just seems more chill, and natural, but somehow, booze is totally okay. That part was always so strange for me, but mine was really looking at it going like, "Yeah, that doesn't seem to go anywhere, again, in the long run, very well." I think if you're hitting it on a consistent basis, I think eventually, you probably, your nervous system, and your brain, and stuff, I think there's just a lot that you're going to have to deal with.

Shelby Stanger:               

I think this is good, because we're going to air this around the holiday, so I think this will be a good conversation we talk about for people to consider. Whether they're making resolutions, or-

Gabby Reece:                  

Or pick.

Shelby Stanger:               

Yeah.

Gabby Reece:                  

If you go, "Yo, I'm going on that favorite party and just off the hook, and I am going to be with ... " It's like, "Great, save it for them, blow off some steam," but I think that's another thing. I have a friend whose dad told him, he was very open about his kids trying different drugs, or mushrooms, or things, and he said, "But never do it to escape from something." I thought that was very interesting. Maybe with alcohol, if you're using it because it's like, the stress and stuff is coming down, or you don't have an outlet, that has to get addressed. If you go and it's for celebration, and it's around that, I think that's probably a better place. That's easier said than done. People are sitting in traffic for hours every day, they're at a job, they're dealing with a lot of things. That's why I think the breathing is very, very powerful, and people can roll their eyes, and be like, "Oh, yeah." Seriously, you can get high on the breathing.

Shelby Stanger:               

No, I think the breathing is awesome. You also do the sauna.

Gabby Reece:                  

Sauna, the sauna is about 220, I set 32, and then, I try to do some homework and stretching, and things like that.

Shelby Stanger:               

How long are you in the sauna for?

Gabby Reece:                  

Until it's unbearable.

Shelby Stanger:               

For you?

Gabby Reece:

Some days, when you're tired, it's probably like 12 minutes. When you're feeling probably good, it's about 18. It just depends. People have to know, if they do heat and ice later in the day, most likely their tolerance is less.

Shelby Stanger:               

You do it every day? Sauna and ice?

Gabby Reece:                  

I don't.

Shelby Stanger:               

No?

Gabby Reece:                  

If I'm lucky, I get in there about three days a week. Laird is probably five days a week.

Shelby Stanger:

Will you do sauna and then ice, or is it one of the other?

Gabby Reece:

No, no, they live together in my world.

Shelby Stanger:

Okay, got it.

Gabby Reece:

Because one without the other is not quite as good. In our house, sometimes, we do sauna, no ice, because sauna, really, as to what we're learning more and more, sort of maybe the heat is the ultimate king, as far as [inaudible 00:26:53] proteins, all cause mortality, decreasing that, Alzheimer's, there's just a lot of really great benefits to getting into sauna. Dr. Rhonda Patrick has done a ton of research on that, if people want to look that up.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, she was the first episode of the year.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, or re-listen to your episode with her, I'm sure she discussed it. The ice is, it's like the most, really, honest place you can be. You have hormone regulation, mode elevation, skin circulation, thermal regulating. Then, also, sometimes, it's like, "Yo, this is hard and uncomfortable, and I'm going to do it." I think, sometimes, that goes back, again, to "I'm going to do things that are not destructive to myself that I don't want to, because that's being honest."

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, I like this. I thought we should go to the more emotional side of all of this, but first of all, what are you excited about now? You do so many things. You write books. You do training. You are a mom, and a wife, an author.

Gabby Reece:

I don't know that I'm hardwired to go way, way up, and way, way down, as far as like, "I'm excited." Because I think maybe based on the way I grow up, I just wanted things to be pretty good, if that makes sense. For a really long time, 30 years, I have had the great opportunity to make my life a version of what I really wanted to be, which is there's some level of peace in it, and order. I think I actually really appreciate that, because I don't know that I grow up with that. Then, I was well-aware of, "Oh, I got to play volleyball for a living, and I am in a relationship with someone that I genuinely love and respect." It's not like the other stuff, like the business stuff, it's fun, and sometimes, you roll up a heavy stone up a hill for two years, a project, and finally, if it happens, you're like, "Okay, that feels good." As far as being excited about things, I think I have a tendency to really connect to the real things in my life.

Then, I challenge myself and use the work so that I can express that other side of myself, because believe me, my children, and my husband are my number one, but if I was just someone's mother, or just someone's wife, I think for me, because I'm a little selfish that way, I think I would not handle that well. I think what makes me feel really centered is when I can also have these projects, that I'm just myself. I'm not even like a woman. I'm just me, as a person.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, you're very, honestly you right now on the podcast, it's really refreshing. I feel that.

Gabby Reece:

Well, it's not that I don't have a lot to hide, I don't think that I do, and I'm really imperfect, but I think I learned a long time ago I wasn't going to really present something that was so radically different than who I was, because I won't be able to sustain that. As I change, hopefully, that message has extensions to it, but I think what we ... We miss some of the really small stuff that's really the best stuff, and maybe living with the partner that I have, or the environment, that's easier to do in my everyday life.

Shelby Stanger:

It sounds like right now, you're really focusing, rather than on all these big projects, on this small stuff that brings you peace, and joy, and [crosstalk 00:30:25].

Gabby Reece:                  

Or, I'm noticing, because the big projects take a lot of work, and they're there, believe me. There's a few, some TV projects that we're producing, one that I will be hosting, and these things, if anybody who knows, has done this business, they take forever.

Shelby Stanger:               

Sometimes, they go, or sometimes, they don't, or do these definitely go?

Gabby Reece:                  

Absolutely, of course. No, you throw 50 things on the wall, and you hope two were good. We've done that with businesses. We have a fitness business XPT, and we do events, and Laird's creamer business, which are-

Shelby Stanger:               

It's everywhere right now, it's amazing.

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah, I'm very involved with that business, and so-

Shelby Stanger:               

It tastes really good.

Gabby Reece:                  

It's really good.

Shelby Stanger:

Really good.

Gabby Reece:

I think what's fun about that business is it's like you almost feel like you can share it with people.

Shelby Stanger:               

It's coconut coffee creamer, for those who don't know.

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah.

Shelby Stanger:               

It's called Laird Superfood.

Gabby Reece:

It's vegan.

Shelby Stanger:

It's vegan, if you're a hippy, like-

Gabby Reece:

Because we don't want to-

Shelby Stanger:

You can't [crosstalk 00:31:17] everybody.

Gabby Reece:

No. Yeah, well, you can't make everybody happy.

Shelby Stanger:

Good for you.

Gabby Reece:

That business has done surprisingly well. Laird is typically the idea person in our house, and I'm the execution person.

Shelby Stanger:

That's great balance.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, we have our understanding.

Shelby Stanger:

We're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor. When we come back, Gabby shares more gems of wisdom about how to live wildly, and also, talks about who her favorite mentors are.

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You've always come across to me as this vision of, you're my vision of a confident woman, but I'm sure that you've had to overcome something that you're insecure about in life.

Gabby Reece:

Sure.

Shelby Stanger:

Do you have any stories that you could share with us? Because I think there's a lot of people listening that are insecure about something right now, and they just need to overcome it.

Gabby Reece:

Well, I think you have to put things in piles of, "Is this in my control, and this is out of my control." The stuff that's out of your control, what I learn to do really early was go, "How much time am I going to spend worrying about that, if it's out of my control?" Simplifying it that way. Then, if it's like, "Hey, this is in my control." Then, go, "Okay, well, let's look at that." I had a bit of a bumpy childhood, which is fine, because that's the other thing, you start going, "Well, that narrative is over, so maybe I want to be a part of a new narrative." It is definitely something that formed me. Let's just use it as a context for, that's what educated me. Also, developed some really great skills that I have, and also some skills that I've had to get rid off, because they don't serve me in the story that I live now.

Shelby Stanger:

I like that.

Gabby Reece:

Letting go of that is maybe one of the most difficult things, because it's probably also hard wiring. I'd say to people, I grew up really tall, and unusual, six feet at 12 years old, no real great stability. I, in a way, felt like I faked my way through college volleyball. It's really funny. I went there last week, they retired my jersey, and I have a record, a couple of records for blocking, which I think is very strange.

Shelby Stanger:

It's cool.

Gabby Reece:

The entire time, though, I felt like an impostor, because I got thrown in late. I was winging it, trying to use listening, and then, putting into physical motion. Then, I went to the pros, and I understood it was an opportunity, but it was also something that was really hard for me, because a lot of my peers had this idea about who I was, because I also got different types of attention that created a division between me and my peers.

Shelby Stanger:

Well, you're really pretty, so I'm sure you had some haters.

Gabby Reece:

Well, okay, but, or I got a Nike deal.

Shelby Stanger:

Got it, first-

Gabby Reece:

I had a lot of opportunity. I was very, very fortunate, and I was doing a lot of extra work, too, but still, I had the chance to do the work. My point is, I think it wasn't being insecure. It was about being all that I could be. I was apologizing for a lot of years, trying to be less than, or small. Nobody really knew when I was in the job, like in professional sports, on MTV, on Nike, and still not really being as robust as I felt inside, because I didn't want to be alienated. I didn't want to offend anyone. I didn't want for anyone to think I thought I was a big deal. That was really, really hard for a long, long time.

Shelby Stanger:

Well, it must have been hard. I feel like though if you were around, if that version of yourself are around today, you would have been able to be more robust, because right now, it's the time of a confident woman.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah. Okay, we could get into the confident woman, and I have my definitive opinions about that, but the thing is, is that I was confident enough to do it, and to portray it, but inside.

Shelby Stanger:

Okay.

Gabby Reece:

Also, when you're working around other women, it's a very interesting thing to find women that will support you, that you will support, and be like, "Oh, you're a kick ass." Also, never to take it personal. We always take everything personal. Here, you are on a competitive environment, so that makes it hard, like you're waring against each other. Also, I was not groomed for success, so I battled that the whole time, like, "Why am I getting to do this?" That was another thing that took me probably till I was 30 years old, to go, "Why am I allowed to do this?" That's just something. I talk to somebody about this yesterday who's going through the same thing. If you really have been given an opportunity, and you feel shame, or weird, or guilty about it, the best thing you could is just say thank you and do the best you can with the gift.

Because feeling weird, or guilty, or shame doesn't do anything. If you don't take care of the gift, and that's the other thing I always say, we're just stewards of a gift, take care of the gift. Then, the gift will get moved, and you'll get a different gift, and that's fine.

Shelby Stanger:

I really like that analogy of having gifts, and if you have a talent, or you have something you've been given, or you landed a cool job, harness that gift and treat it well, and have some self-love about it. I really like that.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, and the notion of humility is, it is no better than and it is no less than anyone. I think that is also something really important, and women, even more than men, we don't get to it as easily as they do. They just do it easier, whether it's testosterone, or the way their brain's wired, or whatever. It's okay if somebody doesn't like you. If you are doing the best that you can, and you're trying to make good decisions, and not be completely selfish, and work hard, it's okay if people don't like you. I think that was one of my biggest things to get over, was not feeling like I wasn't worthy of these amazing things that were coming my way. It's not that I feel more worthy now, I just say, thank you.

Shelby Stanger:               

What do you teach your daughter?

Gabby Reece:                  

Which one? I have three of them. They don't listen to me. I'm just kidding.

Shelby Stanger:               

Being a mom, it sounds really challenging. I didn't listen to my mom at certain parts of my life.

Gabby Reece:                  

No, they watch you, they don't listen to you.

Shelby Stanger:               

How do you give advice to ... How are you trying to advise your daughters to be confident women today?

Gabby Reece:                  

Well, it starts with me, right? I'm not walking around talking about, "Do I look fat? Does this look okay?" I'm living an example and I am very clear about the words that I speak, as far as I don't have ... If I have that dialog, it's inner, and I catch myself right away. I'm not passing that on to my daughters.

Shelby Stanger:               

Slow down, if you have that dialog-

Gabby Reece:                  

Oh, yeah, some mornings.

Shelby Stanger:               

You're seeing yourself ... We all have it as women, we're like, "Oh, I don't like how my jeans fit, or whatever, [crosstalk 00:38:51] top."

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah.

Shelby Stanger:               

What do you say to yourself to break that habit right now, right then?

Gabby Reece:                  

I just see, again, I'm not ... I just ask myself, is that really productive? This is like an indulgence, and a weakness, that it doesn't serve anything, so what are you doing? It doesn't mean I don't feel that way, but I just figure out, I got to get through this quickly because, am I going to be younger tomorrow? I'm not. Okay, so all I can do is eat the best that I can, move, try to live the best life I can, and that's all you can do. If your jeans are this, or that, or whatever, at a certain point, you got to get over it. You got to be a big girl and be like, okay with it. That doesn't mean that you're not aware of time. I'm completely aware of time. In whatever, 14 months, I'll be 50 years old.

Shelby Stanger:               

That's awesome.

Gabby Reece:                  

Yeah, and it's this, I'm one of seven billion people, who cares? Does anyone really care?

Shelby Stanger:               

For a 50-year old, I'm not supposed to say you look good, because someone called me out on the podcast, and say, "Shelby, you look great."

Gabby Reece:                  

I look healthy. Great. I have vitality. No, my point is ... No, I'm kidding.

Shelby Stanger:               

You have this energy about you that's very youthful, and rad, and positive.

Gabby Reece:                  

Well, yeah, and because ... and I think that's an important thing. Laird's dearest friend just passed away, 85 years old. This guy Don Wildman, not male, not female, not young, not old, you're curious, you're learning, you're open, you want to try something, you want to listen to music, do it. For me, I would like to be partially masculine, feminine, and hopefully, use the wisdom of living a few years, but not be like, "Oh, these kids today." It's like, "Well learn about what they're going through. See what their experience is. Okay, you don't love all their music, but what are they listening to?" Ask them. I think that's helpful. I'm not the most playful person. Laird is very naughty and playful, so he brings that energy, which I think is really important, but I just think we don't have to get trapped by it, but certainly, yes, you can have a moment and be like, "Whoa."

I've said to Laird, "Today, I feel like I'm a million years old." He's like, "Oh, you feel you're like a million years old?" Then, I hear what that sounds like, and I'm like, "Moving on." Because, also, if you had something, like so and so was sick, or something was going down, or you get run over by a car, would you really be worried about it? No, you'd be like, "I will be so grateful to live X amount of years, or not be sick, or whatever." I think it's having the discipline to get there sooner, but also living in a way to support even arriving at that feeling. If I eat well, and I'm moving, I have a better shot at arriving at that perspective than I do if I have whatever doughnuts, and I didn't do anything, because then, you're moving down the, "I feel tired. I feel bummed." I think that when people ask me, "Why do you train so hard?" It's like, "Yeah, so I can deal with that other stuff."

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, but your self-talk is really important, too. If I say something negative my dude also says, "That's so boring. Move on." It's boring, [crosstalk 00:42:05] boring.

Gabby Reece:

It is.

Shelby Stanger:

To your daughters, you just try to live by example?

Gabby Reece:

I think you just have to be the example. Also, my daughters, one of them is more similar to me than the others. When I say similar, sort of the in the way the brain works. They've actually been the opportunity for me to learn, because I do it this way. I have one of my daughters said to me, "What might be really easy for you to deal with may not be so easy for me to deal with." When she said that, I thought, that's really important to hear, because we are also different, and to encourage her to trust her own voice, and the way she does things, because it's going to be her life, it's not going to be my life that she's living.

Shelby Stanger:

How old are your daughters?

Gabby Reece:

Ten, just 15, and 23.

Shelby Stanger:

Oh, wow, they're in the thick of it.

Gabby Reece:

Oh, yeah.

Shelby Stanger:

Teenage, and changes, and that's great, Gabby.

Gabby Reece:

Oh, it's great.

Shelby Stanger:

You've raised three amazing daughters.

Gabby Reece:

We'll see, the metrics take like 18 to 20 years, so we'll see. No, I'm just kidding.

Shelby Stanger:

No, [crosstalk 00:43:08] okay.

Gabby Reece:

Listen, this has been the greatest, because it's the most important thing you do, and you're not really in charge of, in control, you're in charge of yourself, but it is for sure the most humbling and difficult thing. I always joke with my youngest daughter, I'm like, "I have the stamina, just so you know." But there are days you go, "Oh my God, they might win, I don't know." Also, imagine, it's your own genetics, with a partner, and so, it's not like I had any [crosstalk 00:43:39]-

Shelby Stanger:

It's like you see the worst of yourself.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, the worst and the best.

Shelby Stanger:

The best.

Gabby Reece:

And I don't have a lay down kid. Between Laird and I, who's laying down? Who's going to be like, "Yeah, no, you go." It's like double, and you just see it and you just ... Then, it's, "Listen, you've got to just stay open to expanding." I've said this, I have tools in my tool belt, only a couple, and I need to keep getting new ones, because it's very easy for parents to say, "well, this is how we do it." Great, but is that the best way to do it?

Shelby Stanger:

Are your kids homeschooled, the ones that are in-

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, my one just graduated from USC.

Shelby Stanger:

Nice.

Gabby Reece:

Then, the younger two, for now, are homeschooled. We have an under and over on my middle, that she has to finish something by June, and if she doesn't, then, she goes to conventional school, so we'll see.

Shelby Stanger:

That's a good motivation.

Gabby Reece:

Well, it's her choice. She's a tennis player, so she says she wants to be, but we'll see. I liked it, because we live in two places, but listen, I think in all of these, somehow, it's like, "How do you try to keep it as simple as possible?" Also, don't react, and don't put your crap on them, because it's really easy to do. Sometimes, that thing about kids, it's like, they're going to struggle, and you have to let them, and that's the worst. They're going to have stuff, and something is going to happen to them that you didn't want to happen all of that, and that's all part of it.

Shelby Stanger:

I like that we've talked about your relationship with yourself, which is pretty much number one, your relationship with your children, and I'd love to talk to you about your relationship with your partner, because this show is all about adventure, and living wildly. I think there's a lot of people who listen that date someone, that's also an adventurer. I know, my guy walks to the beat of his own drum, and that's so fun, and that's what's attractive, but there's a little part of that that sometimes can be challenging. I've heard you give relationship advice before in your own podcast, and I just would love to hear just a little bit of, Gabby's keys to ... because handling Laird seems like the ultimate-

Gabby Reece:

Well, you don't handle Laird.

Shelby Stanger:

Well, whatever, being in a relationship with Laird sounds really fun.

Gabby Reece:

You don't handle Laird.

Shelby Stanger:

But it seems like you'd have to have some patience, and love, and mutual understanding, and I don't know. I feel like you should talk about this.

Gabby Reece:

Listen, I think it's, first of all, figuring out what you really want, because everyone ... people join relationships and then, they just tell the other person all the things that they're not. This goes back to, what am I in charge of? I think somehow, I met Laird at 25 years old, I was very clear that I wanted somebody, and I didn't know it, but sort of actually was above the white noise. Laird is not distracted. He's not like, "Oh shiny things, shiny people." He's not. He's also masculine in the way that is the highest compliment, which is, I will protect you. I will fix it. I will help a friend without ever being asked. I will show up, and be honest. Laird isn't really ... People can say whatever they want. Laird has some rough edges, but Laird is a really honorable person. I thought about, "Oh, do you want a nice guy?" No, I'd rather have a good guy.

Nice maybe wasn't so interesting to me, right? The other thing I realized, too, is that I needed somebody that, the expectation without enforcement was, you will bring your best game, and so will I. Because I don't need someone try to keep me in check, but I don't need a doormat either. That wasn't going to make me a better person, and I knew that. First, I think, I would say to people, be clear about what you have to have. Is it funny? Is it kindness? Is it, are they going to co-parent with you? Are they going to raise the children, or are they going to be the bread winner? Whatever it is. Be clear. What are your three to five things you have to have? Then, there's just a lot of compromise, to some degree below. The other thing that you start to learn, and sort of being a grown up, is, "Oh, yeah, that drives me nuts." Really? Cool. Follow that line. Most likely, it takes you right to the very thing, that is one of the core things that you love about that person.

You wouldn't say, "Well, get rid of the one thing, that side." Because then, it gets through to the other side, so you have to be really clear. It's like Laird, he's restless sometimes, he's like a caged animal, but it's because he has a passion and a pursuit for the ocean, and I admire that, because it's really pure. It's the purest thing. Laird is very pure about that.

Shelby Stanger:

It's mother nature.

Gabby Reece:

It is.

Shelby Stanger:

It's the best.

Gabby Reece:

The way he honors it, and prepares for it, and has dedicated ... because you see that same dedication he has for surfing big waves, daily dedication, whether the waves are here, or coming, or whatever, he has for his family, and he has for our relationship. It's like, he's relentless when he's dedicated. You're not like, "Oh, we'll stop chasing waves, or be complacent, and sit in a couch, but love me passionately." That doesn't work. Go, be passionate, and that I get the overflow on that. You give people space. One time, he said to me, "You think it's hard to live with, try being like this." I thought, "Oh my God, I can just walk out. That's right, I can go to another room." Then, every once in a while, you stand up for yourself, and you go, "Hey, what's up?" I've even had this conversation with Laird, "Do you still want to be married?"

In a very matter of fact way, and he's like, "What?" I'm like, "Well, for the last three days." He's like, "No." It's sometimes reminding them, "Hey, I have complete ability to give you the room to be all these things, but can you include me and make me still a part of it, and not completely take it out on me?" I think you have to know what you want, and I wanted somebody who was ... who could step in on the things I couldn't handle. By the way, that might have been two times, three times a year. Then, I'm the one every day hitting the mark, but we have different roles. I think that in this day and age, for me, as masculine as I am, in my thinking, and even my ... I'm six foot three, I weigh 180 pounds, it's like, in work, it's like you're just dropping off information, you're objective.

I actually wanted somebody who I could be really, really ... express the feminine side, and everyone's different. I've said this many times, there isn't two female energies or two masculine energies in a house, even in the same sex relationship. Somebody takes on the masculine, and someone takes on the feminine. That was just my choice, and then, the other and most maybe really important part of all of it, is it's two fold. Laird's job is not to make me happy. My job is to make myself happy, and my job is not to make Laird happy, he's got to figure that out. Happiness flows in and out. We don't arrive at happiness. I think that that's something really important, and for a lot of women, you get red Cinderella, here it comes on the horse, and they pick you up. It's a false bill of goods, and I'll even go one step further to say that I actually think, if you have a female that's conscious about the landscape, most likely, she will help the guy reach his potential. She'll have to take care of her business, herself.

Shelby Stanger:

I love this. I always thought the best relationship advices you have to make yourself happy. Exactly. You hit it on the nail. No one can make ... It's not somebody's job.

Gabby Reece:

No baby is going to get dropped off. No husband is going to get dropped off. Now, can they enhance your life? Is it the color? Is it the richness? It's all those things, and I've experienced so many things because of Laird, and the way he lives, and that is probably intuitively why I chose him as a life partner, but it's not his job.

Shelby Stanger:

Well, I think this is fun, because we haven't really done a podcast on relationships, and part of living wildly, along with health, love is so important.

Gabby Reece:

I think, listen, I think you can do it all the ways you want. If you just want to be, "Yo, I'm living a singular life, and I'm crushing my work, or I'm taking just these adventures, and that's making me fulfilled." I've actually come to a place in my life where if people can identify how to make themselves happy, first, that trumps all. Because it doesn't have to be like, "Then, you have to be married. Then, you have to have kids." Forget it, it's, if people can actually figure that out. Now, to pick a partner, the growth that happens, good and bad, through being in a relationship, you can't really replicate that. I used to joke all the time, and say, "If I could be a philosopher on a top of a hill, I could always be on my higher self, too. Like, I want to see the guy who's all zenned out, and has like a couple of kids, and a check, and it's like, "Okay, now, you're talking."

That's some real evolved philosophy, because then, you're really putting in play in the chaos, but I always want to encourage people to, "Hey, whatever way it feels right and good to you, have the confidence to pursue that because you're the one who's going to live it." I had a coach from college who taught me all about personal accountability.

Shelby Stanger:

Let's talk about that.

Gabby Reece:

That's everything.

Shelby Stanger:

Because I was just going to ask you who your mentors were.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, my coach, Cecile Reynaud, she actually was just visiting me from Florida a month ago, and it's like this, what's so great about accountability is, if I don't like something because I'm personally accountable, I can go, "Yo, I'm going to change this or that about it, and make it better. If I'm pointing fingers at everybody and it's his fault, and it's my partner's fault, and it's my bosses' fault, we never have control, we never are in charge." I even think, sometimes, like we've been talking, obviously, a lot about like this whole Me Too Movement, and all of that, is the other thing I thought that was really important though is we have to be careful to not alienate an entire group of people, meaning, men.

Because I know more good men than not, and so I think actually if you ask me right now in this day age what I think is so important is that nobody has discussion, or nuance, or any of that stuff, everyone's afraid, and everyone's has got an opinion, and everyone's politically correct, and all of that.

Shelby Stanger:

We've lost our sense of humor, which really bums me out.

Gabby Reece:

Oh my gosh. Yeah, I can't imagine having to date ... The joke is like, "Okay, I'm going to put my hand on your right shoulder, are you comfortable with that? I'm going to videotape, would you consent that it's ... " It's going to be tough. I get it about the pendulum, because things have to shift.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, it's [crosstalk 00:54:42] to go back.

Gabby Reece:

But, we have to remember that most men are sons, and fathers, and brothers, and husbands, and boyfriends, and they like women. I think, actually, we should work on our self health, and the health of our ... the world that we live on, the planet, and we certainly have to identify the bad humans, male and female, but that ... the level of combativeness, it feels unproductive. It feels actually a little cry baby to me, versus, like real warrior type people, or masterful people, I think they go about it a different way. I don't know, I think it's an interesting time for that.

Shelby Stanger:

It is an interesting time. That was one mentor. Do you have any podcasts, or books, or things you listen to that you really like that you could recommend?

Gabby Reece:

Yeah. Well, Jordan Peterson wrote 12 Rules To Live By, and he's a Canadian psychologist, he makes certain people mad, which I think is strange, because it's just factual. He's also been on Joe Rogan quite a bit. Homo Sapiens was an interesting read. There's a woman that actually Byron Katie, who is also a ... She has a program called The Work, and that was introduced to her through a friend of mine, and it's basically like she helps people break out of certain habits, like, if you have a thought, and you go like, "Well, is that true?" She'll say, "Well, is that true? Can you prove it to be true? Who are you when you feel those thoughts, and then, who would you be without that?" She's about 75 or 76 years old. You think maybe she's like an angel. They joke like maybe when she was in her mid 40s, she had a walk in, nobody really quite knows.

She had a complete life change. She was an Agoraphobe. Anyway, I think she's fascinating, just as somebody to kind of contemplate as you're managing yourself, your feelings, if you're raising children in a relationship. It's not circling the bowl. There's a forward direction to it, because sometimes, for me, with the therapy talk, it's like, "Well, how do you feel about that?" It's like, "Oh my gosh." There is a forwardness to it.

Shelby Stanger:

I felt there's something really funny about therapy, it's like, if someone asks you like, "How are you doing?" Of course, you're going to find something bad to talk about.

Gabby Reece:

Totally.

Shelby Stanger:

I know I said, it's more funny.

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, no, yeah. I think those right now, obviously, I love Tim Ferriss, and I do, I have been listening to a lot of Joe Rogan, but I just like science oriented, because if you're going to be moving and eating a certain way, I think it's also important to understand, because in the days you don't want to ... Because I would actually not eat a cupcake for inflammation versus pounds. It sounds silly, but I have a fake knee.

Shelby Stanger:               

No, I totally [crosstalk 00:57:52].

Gabby Reece:

I have a fake knee. I'm like, "Oh, yeah, no. A pound here or there, I can get that off. I know how to get that off." My overall well-being and health-

Shelby Stanger:

Or Diet Coke, I wouldn't drink that, because it might taste good, but it could cause Alzheimer's later on.

Gabby Reece:

Exactly. I think that for me, once I start to really understand how relationship went with things around me, whether why am I moving this way, or why am I eating. I love Kelly Starrett, he has this Supple Leopard MobWOD.

Shelby Stanger:

WOD, yeah.

Gabby Reece:                  

His information, what's Hunter's last name? There's a gentleman on Instagram, I can't believe I'm forgetting his last name, he has Hunter Fitness, he does the craziest stretching and mobility. I think he's genetically like ... It's not like, "Oh, I'm a yogi." It's something else. He's really interesting.

Shelby Stanger:

Was he like half gymnastics, half like-

Gabby Reece:

Yeah, but he's pretty solid, but he has a really interesting curriculum getting people to open up their hips, and their feet, and things like that, really, really cool. I love Dr. Andy Galpin a lot, because he's just so straightforward, and just-

Shelby Stanger:

He's Brian MacKenzie's partner?

Gabby Reece:

Yup.

Shelby Stanger:

Okay.

Gabby Reece:

I love Dr. Galpin, because he'll say things like this, "Well, what about eating for your blood type?" He goes, "Well, it's ridiculous, because we need to be adaptable." If we were in a certain tribe, if you had to eat for your blood type, that's not adaptable, we wouldn't survive.

Shelby Stanger:

Or, if you move to a different country.

Gabby Reece:

Right, but what he says is, "But, if your parent comes to you," his dad came to him, and said, "Oh, I'm eating for my blood type," but it got him to eat better, and real food, he goes, "Great. Eat for your blood type." For me, it's this malleability, it's not this rigidness, and it's also reminding people, it's still about you, the individual person. I can never tell you how to eat. I can never tell you how to move. You're still your unique self. I always encourage people to figure that out, even on activities and things like that. I'm trying to think, Paul Chek, I followed ... I've known Paul for 16, 17 years, and he's still, if you really listen to Paul, because now, he's past it, he's passed the food, and passed the movement, and now, he's really talking about more spiritual aspects, because we can eat perfect. We can move perfect, but if we don't find levels and moments of that peace or a sense of understanding, or love, if you will, we miss a lot of it.

Shelby Stanger:

That's awesome. You've given a lot of good tips. What do you like to do for fun? I'm curious.

Gabby Reece:

Me? I like to work for fun.

Shelby Stanger:

If you could have a party, we ask our guest this, if you could have any kind of party, who's coming, what are we doing, what kind of people are invited? What are you eating? Drinking?

Gabby Reece:

Well, I do that a lot at my house.

Shelby Stanger:

[Crosstalk 01:00:36] dinner parties?

Gabby Reece:

Because we have a lot of family dinners. We call them family dinner, and then, it's every stray comes over, and then, we all sit around the table, and there's a lot of laughter, there's a lot of giving each other grief. There's probably a lot of kombucha, because there's not a lot of booze.

Shelby Stanger:

I love kombucha.

Gabby Reece:

Me, too.

Shelby Stanger:

I'm like, is it bad for you?

Gabby Reece:

It probably is.

Shelby Stanger:

It's probably, it's like soda with a lot of sugar.

Gabby Reece:

A little bit, well, because of the sugar. That's the thing you just have to monitor, is how much sugar, but I think if you did it the way it was intended, like, "Oh, you got the scoby, and you've got all this stuff." To better really ... and to have my kids there, because for me, I think that quality time, especially some of your friends, maybe you only see them a couple of times a year, and that's what you build the friendship on, those moments. I have another friend who told me, "Hey, you know that they're there. If you have that time to visit, and build that relationship, great, but you don't have to walk away with a bunch of weird guilt, or sadness that you're not going to see each other every day, or talk every day, but it's just about taking it in at that time." I really do love movies, I love to go to movie theaters. Before our kids and all of that, I used to go to the Nuart, and all of those, and watch random movies, because I think I like that state.

Shelby Stanger:

Have you seen Free Solo? Alex Honnold's movie?

Gabby Reece:

I haven't.

Shelby Stanger:

I think you will like it.

Gabby Reece:

Okay, I'll check it out.

Shelby Stanger:

It blew me away.

Gabby Reece:

Really?

Shelby Stanger:

I interviewed him, and then, I saw the movie in the theaters. It's the first movie I've gone to, and it was awesome.

Gabby Reece:

Going into a theater and seeing a good movie-

Shelby Stanger:

Felt amazing.

Gabby Reece:

It's amazing.

Shelby Stanger:

Yeah, it really was old school. It's nice. Gabby, this has been so great. Thank you so much for your time. Any advice to people who just want to live wildly, which really just means reach their potential, live a better life, be their best self.

Gabby Reece:

If something's calling them to try or to do, or to move away from, like even ... I would never say, "Quit your job," but I'm saying that we have this one life, and it is very short. We can't allow the fear to get in the way of the dream, but we have to be realistic, I believe, and I'm very realistic about how I map things out. Laird and I talk about this a lot, where there was a Navy Seal, they don't even know his name, who said, "Never let your memories be greater than your dreams." I think sometimes I understand about fear, because it's been a huge fire in my life, that has made me probably, it has a lot to do with my success, but then, there comes a point where, and again, Laird and I have talked about this, your intention, if you really love something, or you love doing something, that will actually be as impactful as fear.

You just have to make sure that your reasons are lined up, and you're ready to work your ass off for whatever it is. Even if it's a wild adventure. If you go, "Hey, I'm going to go mountain climb, or rock climb that face of that thing." Well, the amount of training, and focus, and dedication, it's all work. To listen to that voice, and have people around you that support that, that dream, or that thing that you want to undertake ... I think the notion of, when you want to react, like an ego, or an anger, if you experiment with doing the opposite a few times, it does make things a lot easier. It just does. It took me probably to my 40s where I would smile when I wanted to come home grumpy, and fuzzy, but I would come home and just be like, "Hey." Give every ... Then, I could still share my feelings, but it was received so differently.

I do that in my everyday life, too. If I walk around and see people, I try to go out of my way to be polite and nice. Having said that, if I have to get down and get dirty, I certainly can, but I think lead with that bravery, and that love, and it's your song. You have to live your song, so whatever that takes.

Shelby Stanger:

I love that. Thank you so much, Gabby. Gabby, thank you so much for inviting me to your house in Malibu, and doing this interview. It was awesome. I took so much from it. When we were done, Gabby sent me a box Laird Superfoods. That stuff is ridiculous. You can get it at Health Food store, or online, but I highly recommend it. Gabby, thank you so much. I really hope to come and train with you. Her house is awesome. They have a slack line above their swimming pool, and a barrel, that's a sauna, it's shaped like a barrel, that she actually records podcast on, and it's on podcast once, so you can also check out her podcast. She has her own website. She's pretty easy to find. Definitely check out more on Gabby. I know she's pitching some show, so hopefully, we see more of her in the future. Thank you for listening to this show.

Thank you for writing amazing reviews, telling me the show is affecting you. A lot of you have been writing me lately, and I really appreciate it. Wherever you are in the world, don't forget, some of the best adventures often happen when you follow your wildest ideas. Tell some friends about this show. If you liked it, write reviews on Apple Podcast. We'll see you next week.

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