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bethk59
02/01/2011

Snow kicking up

When I snowshoe, the snow kicks up onto the backs of my legs and onto my butt. I noticed that my friends don't have the same problem. Is this a problem with my snowshoes or am I doing something wrong?

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Some snowshoes will flip up more snow purely based on their design.  You most likely purchased a snowshoe with a "fixed binding" where heavy duty straps are used underneath the binding.  This type of binding has the advantage of giving you some shock absorption and side to side flex in uneven terrain.  Stepping over obstacles and backing up is also a bit easier because the tail of the snowshoe does not drop away as much from your foot.  The disadvantage, as you noted, is that the is a tendency for snow to be kicked up onto the backs of one's legs.  Atlas's SLS (Spring Loaded Suspension) is a common example of a fixed binding.


The other common type of binding is a rotating (or floating) binding that pivots under the ball of the foot.  The amount of pivot will vary between models, but allows the snowshoe to drop away from the foot and shed snow.  These bindings usually Can be identified by the rods or pins that allow the shoe to rotate 90 degrees or more.  These shoes are great in deep snow or kicking steps into slopes, but can be a little awkward when backing up or maneuvering over logs. Tubbs and MSR are well known for using rotating bindings.  Atlas has introduced their FRS (or Free-Rotating™ Suspension) which still uses bands underfoot, but also incorporates rotation and therefore limits tail-flip (8 & 9 series shoes).

REI offers a great overview article on snowshoe designs in their Expert Advice section: http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/snowshoes.html

posted by sussman on Tue Oct 25 22:42:26 PDT 2011

It is most likley the brand / style of snowshoe that you use, I would try the MRS.

posted by Hawk-Eye on Fri Apr 01 16:24:50 PDT 2011

Curious.  What brand and model snow shoes do you have?

posted by A.T. Hiker on Wed Feb 02 00:44:22 PST 2011

Curious.  What brand and model snow shoes do you have?

posted by A.T. Hiker on Wed Feb 02 00:44:22 PST 2011

It is most likley the brand / style of snowshoe that you use, I would try the MRS.

posted by Hawk-Eye on Fri Apr 01 16:24:50 PDT 2011

Some snowshoes will flip up more snow purely based on their design.  You most likely purchased a snowshoe with a "fixed binding" where heavy duty straps are used underneath the binding.  This type of binding has the advantage of giving you some shock absorption and side to side flex in uneven terrain.  Stepping over obstacles and backing up is also a bit easier because the tail of the snowshoe does not drop away as much from your foot.  The disadvantage, as you noted, is that the is a tendency for snow to be kicked up onto the backs of one's legs.  Atlas's SLS (Spring Loaded Suspension) is a common example of a fixed binding.


The other common type of binding is a rotating (or floating) binding that pivots under the ball of the foot.  The amount of pivot will vary between models, but allows the snowshoe to drop away from the foot and shed snow.  These bindings usually Can be identified by the rods or pins that allow the shoe to rotate 90 degrees or more.  These shoes are great in deep snow or kicking steps into slopes, but can be a little awkward when backing up or maneuvering over logs. Tubbs and MSR are well known for using rotating bindings.  Atlas has introduced their FRS (or Free-Rotating™ Suspension) which still uses bands underfoot, but also incorporates rotation and therefore limits tail-flip (8 & 9 series shoes).

REI offers a great overview article on snowshoe designs in their Expert Advice section: http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/snowshoes.html

posted by sussman on Tue Oct 25 22:42:26 PDT 2011

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